“Entertaining Tales From Chestnut Cottage”: Shades of Green Part II

Entertaining Tales from Chestnut Cottage presented by kathryn greeley designs

Entertaining Tales from Chestnut Cottage presented by kathryn greeley designs

Entertaining Tales from Chestnut Cottage presented by kathryn greeley designs

Entertaining Tales from Chestnut Cottage presented by kathryn greeley designs

As promised , I will share with you a bit about Wedgwood’s “Napoleon Ivy” pattern.  It has long been a favorite of mine and you might remember it from the chapter “A WEE IRISH SURPRISE” in THE COLLECTED TABLETOP!

Greeley BOOK COVER

Entertaining Tales from Chestnut Cottage presented by kathryn greeley designs

Entertaining Tales from Chestnut Cottage presented by kathryn greeley designs

Wedgwood began production of its Napoleon Ivy pattern in 1815 and retired this pattern in 2003.  It features a cream-colored background with a border of ivy leaves, ranging from dark forest green to a lighter grassy green,  and stems painted in such realistic detail that the texture of the foliage emerges.  Josiah Wedgwood first introduced his cream-colored earthenware body in the 1760s , after perfecting the process and creating a new benchmark for all ceramics.  He presented Queen Charlotte with a tea service in this new body, and she loved it so much that she asked him to call it Queen’s Ware, which is what the style is still referred to as today.  The mark on the backside of this pattern reads, “Napoleon Ivy, as used by Napoleon at St. Helena, 1815, Wedgwood, England”.  This pattern was used by Napoleon at St. Helena in 1815, while in exile on this south Atlantic island.

I recently noticed that Replacements www.replacements.com  has a nice supply of this pattern.

I love all of the lovely shapes and pieces that this pattern has to offer!

Entertaining Tales from Chestnut Cottage presented by kathryn greeley designs

Entertaining Tales from Chestnut Cottage presented by kathryn greeley designs

Entertaining Tales from Chestnut Cottage presented by kathryn greeley designs

I also thought you might enjoy knowing about the green faux bois fabric I used to make the tablecloth.  This is a new pattern from Brunschwig and Fils called “Wood Leaf” .  The green colorway is 8013142.3 and this fabric comes in five additional beautiful colors.  It is a blend of cotton and linen and has a lovely “hand”.

Entertaining Tales from Chestnut Cottage presented by kathryn greeley designs

Entertaining Tales from Chestnut Cottage presented by kathryn greeley designs

If you missed the tablescapes I did in Atlanta last week, you can see this pattern in another “shades of green” presentation!

Entertaining Tales from Chestnut Cottage presented by kathryn greeley designs

Entertaining Tales from Chestnut Cottage presented by kathryn greeley designs

north carolina interior designer kathryn greeley author of the collected tabletop high point market

This entry was posted in China, Entertaining, Entertaining Tales from Chestnut Cottage, Inspired!, Style Guide, Tabletop, Take It From Kathryn, The Collected Tabletop, What's Inspiring Kathryn?, “In the Garden” and tagged , , , , , . Bookmark the permalink.

3 Responses to “Entertaining Tales From Chestnut Cottage”: Shades of Green Part II

  1. Luke says:

    What a lovely setup for a dinner in the garden. Ivy pattern china is classic. I have a few Minton Lothian pieces with an ivy trim that I use on occasion. The history of Napoleon having your Wedgwood pattern makes for a more interesting story to tell to guests though. Glad to see everything is so lush and green in your garden!

  2. Kathryn says:

    Thanks Luke! Hope you are doing well.

  3. Victoria says:

    Kathryn this is such an informative post. I have long favored this pattern. When I still lived in my hometown of Atlanta a friend scooped an entire set for pennies on the dollar. I looked for it off and on for years and never found it. It’s always so interesting to learn the history behind the pattern. Do have a lovely weekend.

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